Happy Thanksgiving!

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Wishing everyone a Happy Thanksgiving!

Our offices will be closed for the holiday, Thursday 11/27 and Friday 11/28.

Have a great weekend!

November 25, 2014 at 1:04 pm Leave a comment

American Screen Print Supply Open House, Nov 22nd

AmericanScreenPrint14-sepsIf you are in the Phoenix, AZ area tomorrow, Saturday, Nov 22nd, please visit American Screen Print Supply’s open house! Kieth Stevens will be printing a fun, special effects design.

Address: 4141 E Raymond St, Phoenix, AZ 85040
(602) 437-5231

Event starts at 10 am and goes to 4 pm.

Food, Demos & Prizes! Bring your friends and family and join the fun!

 

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

November 21, 2014 at 10:57 pm Leave a comment

Proper Ink-Disposal Methods?

InkDisposalPeople often ask whether waste inks can be thrown in the garbage or flushed down the sink. The short answer is “No” to both disposal options.  Steve Kahane recently published an article in Impressions addressing this vital topic every printer needs to know:

Regardless of if you’re using plastisol or water-based inks, you must remember that they contain industrial chemicals, the disposal of which is strictly regulated. In all cases, you should familiarize yourself with local, state and federal regulations.

Plastisol inks are 100% solids. When fully cured, the PVC resin fully absorbs the plasticizers in the ink to form a plastic ink film. Some municipalities may allow fully cured plastisol inks to be disposed or recycled as regular plastic waste in the municipal waste system. Uncured plastisol may be eligible for recycling. If not, it likely will need to be disposed by an authorized chemical waste disposer. If you send your plastisol waste for disposal, ask whether it is eligible for incineration, which completely destroys the waste and, thus, reduces the potential for cleanup liability in later years.

Despite their name, water-based inks aren’t water, nor are they necessarily environmentally friendly or benign. They should not be poured down a sink or into the ground, or thrown in the garbage. They contain various binders and pigments, and may contain solvents, such as formaldehyde or alcohols. Some of these ingredients are considered hazardous. Your local laws may allow you to reduce disposal volumes by opening the lids and allowing the water (and any solvents) to evaporate off. The remaining pigmented binder should then be disposed of in accordance with local regulations.

When disposing of ink containers, ensure they are completely empty. Empty metal drums should be sent to a drum reconditioner for reuse. Empty cardboard drums should be completely empty and disposed of according to manufacturers’ and regulatory requirements. If you use liners in the cardboard drums, the drums can be crushed and thrown away as municipal waste. Empty plastic containers can and should be recycled. If you plan to reuse plastic pails to store or handle liquids, be aware that they can pose a drowning hazard to small kids.

Please remember that improper chemical disposal is a criminal offense and guilty parties (employees, managers and owners) have served jail time and paid large fines. Local municipalities are aggressive in tracking and pursuing offenders, so take the time to research and comply with your local municipal waste laws.

Steve Kahane is International Coatings’ president and CEO. Prior to joining International Coatings, he held senior executive positions in the environment and engineering fields.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

November 19, 2014 at 9:57 am Leave a comment

Holiday Product Must-Haves

HokidayProductsWe are full into the swing of the holiday season already, but here are some product items to keep on hand for those last-minute holiday print requests.

‘Tis the season for all things glittery and shimmery, so be sure to stock up on the following:Stretchy Puffy Snowflake Print

150 Silver Glitter
151 Gold Glitter
155 Crystalina Shimmer
156 Silver Shimmer
157 Gold Shimmer

Of course, be sure to stock up on regular holiday colors:

7606 National Red
7673 Kelly Green

Don’t forget 108 Glow-in-the-Dark for those holiday and New Year’s Eve parties!

In addition, don’t leave out fleece for those cold winter days.  For printing on colored or dark polyester or poly blend fleece, be sure to use the correct low-bleed white as an underbase.  Here’s one suggestion:

7041 Paramount White, a superior bleed blocking white, one of our strongest blockers.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

November 11, 2014 at 8:30 am Leave a comment

Golden Image Award Gold Winner!

GoldenImage_winnerCongratulations to Kieth Stevens on winning SGIA’s prestigious Golden Image Award for his “Peace” fine arts print!

SGIA (the Specialty Graphic Imaging Association) awards their annual Golden Image Award for industry-leading excellence in various specialty imaging categories, including screen print, digital, transfer, and fine arts categories.

Kieth created his print on acid-free paper using 16 acrylic ink colors.  Some of the steps are outlined below.  Once again, we would like to extend a hearty CONGRATULATIONS to Kieth on winning his award!

"Peace" print by Kieth Stevens

“Peace” print by Kieth Stevens

Kieth created a hand-made Template using registration tabs.  Each of the substrates were individually pre-registered and tabs were affixed prior to production.  A  master-template was employed  throughout the film, screen and printing processes.

Kieth created a hand-made Template using registration tabs. Each of the substrates were individually pre-registered and tabs were affixed prior to production. A master-template was employed throughout the film, screen and printing processes.

Each color separation was hand-painted  using brush and a glitter/clear acrylic  medium onto a clear Mylar film. 30%  .008 Glitter to base ratio was used.

Each color separation was hand-painted using brush and a glitter/clear acrylic medium onto a clear Mylar film. 30% 0.008 Glitter to base ratio was used.

Five film positives were created:  Blue, red, green, yellow, and purple

Five film positives were created: Blue, red, green, yellow, and purple

Three screens of varying exposure  strengths were created from each of the  five hand-painted positives, 15 color  screens plus one for the black background were made.

Three screens of varying exposure strengths were created from each of the five hand-painted positives, 15 color screens plus one for the black background were made.

Each of the three screens per color were  printed exactly on top of each other with  varying color strengths (20%, 60%, and  100%) to give depth and complexity to  each color. No micro registration system  was used.

Each of the three screens per color were printed exactly on top of each other with varying color strengths (20%, 60%, and 100%) to give depth and complexity to each color. No micro registration system was used.

16 acrylic eco-friendly inks were  used to create this print.  These inks  also fluoresce under UV light

16 acrylic eco-friendly inks were used to create this print. These inks also fluoresce under UV light

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of phthalate-compliant screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

November 3, 2014 at 8:15 am Leave a comment

New Video: “Gellusion” Special Effects Print

Kieth Stevens coined this printing technique “Gellusion” since it uses gel and high density inks and can be used to print lenticular effects that can give various illusion-type prints.  Kieth has been using this mix and technique since he dreamed it up in the 1990’s.

Lenticular print

Lenticular print

We’ve created a short video, shot at the last ISS Long Beach show, where we demo’d this technique.  Recently, our video was posted on to Impressions Magazine’s website with the following intro:

“Gellusion” is a special-effects printing technique that lends itself well to creating a shiny 3-D effect print on a garment.

This technique combines several different print parameters, like a thick emulsion, and high-density and gel inks.

An overprint using three fluorescent process colors results in a bright and intense RGB color simulation, creating a combination of colors that truly “pop.” A “doming” effect of the gel ink is achieved by curing the print at 375°F. Gellusion also is ideal for printing lenticular effects.

The video, shown above, shows Kieth Stevens, western regional sales manager for International Coatings, demonstrating the Gellusion technique, which he has been using since the 1990s.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

October 24, 2014 at 8:15 am Leave a comment

Printing Basics: Reflective Inks

Optilux 507 Enhanced Reflective Ink

Optilux 507 Enhanced Reflective Ink

We get calls every week about the proper way to print with reflective inks. Following is a brief explanation by John Levocz, International Coatings’ North East Regional Sales Manager, recently published in Impressions, detailing the methods, and reasons behind them, when it comes to reflective-ink printing.

First, always thoroughly stir the reflective ink before printing. Basically, reflective inks are made up of a carrier base and small reflective glass beads. Since the base is thin, the beads will settle if not stirred before printing.

The reflectivity in the ink comes from the reflective beads or particles, not the base. During the course of printing, one flood coat and one squeegee print usually will yield the most reflectivity. By doing this, the base coat will soak into the material, leaving the reflective particles on top of the material so they can reflect the most light. If you do multiple print strokes, you will lay down too much of the base and the reflective beads won’t be able to sit on top of the fabric evenly and properly reflect the light.

Printing reflective ink is not the same as printing white ink on a black shirt, during which the more white ink you lay down, the brighter or more opaque the print is. When printing with reflective ink, less is basically more. Remember to follow all manufacturers’ recommendations for mesh counts, as particle sizes are different and will require different meshes. Using too fine of a mesh count will strain the reflective particles from the carrier base, laying down less than the optimum amount of reflective beads for the best reflectivity. This also will cause the mesh to become clogged with very expensive reflective beads.

For printing on dark colors and when extra opacity is needed, you can print a white underbase and then print the reflective ink on top of it. Just remember that when you do this, you will lose some of the reflectivity due to the base not soaking completely into the material.

Some reflective inks require the use of a catalyst, coupler or adhesion promoter. Basically, they all accomplish the same goal: making sure the reflective beads stay put on the garment. As usual, follow all the manufacturers’ recommendations. They are there for a reason.

When printing reflective inks correctly, they can add a new style of printing to your arsenal. These types of inks can be used as a visibility enhancement on garments for children, as well as for athletic gear like running shirts. With Halloween right around the corner, printing shirts with reflective inks could be a good choice.

John Levocz is North East regional sales manager for International Coatings. For more information, visit iccink.com and read the company’s blog.

International Coatings’ Oplilux® Reflective ink systems are one of the brightest reflective inks in the market.  Optilux® consists of our 505 Reflective and 507 Enhanced Reflective inks.  Click here for more info.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of phthalate-compliant screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

October 14, 2014 at 8:15 am Leave a comment

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"Gellusion" Atom Print

"Gellusion" Atom Print

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