ISS Long Beach This Week: Win A Print Shop Makeover

iss-2017-booth-2041

It’s International Coating’s 60th Anniversary! Join us at ISS Long Beach 2017 and participate in our daily raffles to win an ink kit of your choice – either a color mixing system starter kit or a special effects kit for the lucky daily winner.

All California-based entries will be eligible for a Grand Prize – An Expert Print Shop Makeover. One of our print shop experts will travel to your business for an in-depth consultation on how your shop can run more smoothly and productively!

Our print shop expert will help the winning shop troubleshoot problems and suggest ways it can maximize its capabilities.

So be sure to come by Booth #2041 and enter to win!

For a FREE pass to the show, enter promo code INTERCOAT.

 

 

January 17, 2017 at 11:49 am Leave a comment

Printing Tips for Today’s Fabrics Part 2

stretched-lycraHere is Part 2 of an article that was recently featured in Screen Printing Magazine’s October/November 2016 issue, and on Screenweb.com, Kieth Stevens gives us some tips on printing on today’s modern fabrics:

Read Part 1

Giving Up the Ghost
As I mentioned above, it’s always important to use the right ink for the fabric you’re printing. Using low-bleed inks when they aren’t needed is a good example of what can go wrong. If you print them on 100-percent cotton and some 50/50 fabrics, you can encounter a phenomenon known as ghosting, where an image of the print may inadvertently transfer to the back of a garment stacked on top of it. This happens because the reactive dyes used for some cotton colors can react with the low-bleed bleaching agents in the ink. The ink coming off the dryer is still hot and reactive, the moisture from the shirt may not have completely evaporated, and the stacking creates a hot, humid environment – perfect for the ink to react with the dye in the shirt stacked on top, thus creating an unwanted “ghost” image of the print. If you have a short dryer outfeed or you’re running at a fast belt speed, you may be more likely to see this problem.

Two tips: Be sure to cool each shirt completely before stacking or packing them. And instead of having just one stack of shirts at the end of the dryer, consider creating several to give the garments a chance to cool down before another goes on top.

Stretching for the Cure
Inks for performance fabrics are usually formulated to be low-bleed, but may also have an added ingredient to improve their ability to stretch (such as International Coatings’ Performance Pro 7100 Series inks). This is an important factor with these synthetic materials, which are often designed to stretch more than the cotton fabrics and blends with which many printers are more familiar. Just like the garment, the ink must be able not only to stretch, but also to return to its normal state afterward, a quality called memory. While it’s important to obtain a full cure, as with any plastisol, be careful not to overheat inks printed on highly stretchable fabrics. This tends to make the ink film more brittle than normal and detract from its durability and stretch properties.

 

Stay tuned for Part III…”Garment Considerations” and “Test, Test, Test”

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

January 11, 2017 at 10:49 am 2 comments

Win A Print Shop Makeover at ISS Long Beach

Win A Print Shop Makeover at ISS Long Beach

Join us at the ISS Long Beach Show, January 20-22, 2017 at the Long Beach Convention Center.

International Coatings is celebrating its 60th Anniversary! To commemorate this special occasion, we’ll be preparing and displaying special print samples and displays. We will also have a daily raffle – read on for the details!

Come by booth #2041 and celebrate with us!


Daily Raffle!

In celebration of our 60th Anniversary, we will be raffling off an ink kit of your choice – either a color mixing system starter kit or a special effects kit for the lucky daily winner. 

All California-based entries will also be eligible for a Grand Prize – An Expert Print Shop Makeover. One of our print shop experts will travel to your business for an in-depth consultation on how your shop can run smoother and more productively!

Our print expert will help the winning shop troubleshoot problems and suggest ways it can maximize its capabilities.


Don’t miss out!  Come by Booth #2041 and enter to win!!!
For a FREE  pass to the show, enter promo code INTERCOAT.

See you there!!!

 

January 6, 2017 at 5:15 am 1 comment

Printing Tips for Today’s Fabrics Part 1

7043-guardian-grayIn an article that was recently featured in Screen Printing Magazine’s October/November 2016 issue, and on Screenweb.com, Kieth Stevens gives us some tips on printing on today’s modern fabrics.

Popular, profitable, and often a pain in the neck to print, the latest fashion fabrics can present quite a challenge to shops accustomed to printing standard plastisols on all-cotton garments.

For the most part, today’s ready-for-use plastisol inks haven’t changed all that much over the years, other than the introduction of non-phthalate formulations. (There are, of course, newer non-PVC inks such as silicone, high-solids water based, and acrylic-based plastisol inks, though in this article I’ll be focusing on non-phthalate plastisols.) What has changed, though, are the types and styles of fabrics that printers are asked to decorate.

Over the last several years, the increased cost and lack of availability of cotton has, in part, pressured manufacturers to develop newer fabrics that can be – and often are – challenging to work with. One popular example is the lightweight performance wear that is great for exercising, constructed from a blend of several fibers that each adds its own benefit to the garment. For example, the fabric may be made up of Lycra, which adds stretch; cotton, which adds body; and polyester, which adds lightness and cost benefits.

Battling Dye Migration

battling-dye-migration

Inks formulated for 50/50 blends or 100-percent polyester fabric typically contain low-bleed ingredients to help reduce dye migration. Also known as bleeding or sublimation, dye migration is sometimes encountered with certain colors of polyester garments. It happens with polyester dyes that were heat-set (meaning cured or bonded) to the fibers at lower temperatures than what the shirts will be exposed to in curing standard plastisol inks. So, when you print these colored polyester fabrics and send them through a conveyor dryer at about 320 degrees Fahrenheit, the dyes are re-released (sublimated) and can turn a white ink design on a red garment into an unwanted pink. I’ve also seen instances where a dark blue or black fabric turned pink, not lighter shades of the base garment color as you would expect. (Left.) This phenomenon happens when a shirt that was first colored with a red dye is later over-dyed by the supplier with a darker color, possibly to reduce inventory.

Some inks designed specifically for performance fabrics can be cured at lower temperatures (280 to 300 degrees Fahrenheit) to further combat dye migration. However, some sublimated fabrics are prone to excessive bleeding even at the lower temperatures, leaving little that can be done to stop the white from turning into an unwanted color. This excessive dye migration is especially common with dye-sublimated polyester garments, often found in camouflage style prints. Bleed-blocking inks are now available that work not just by blocking the sublimating dye, but by actually absorbing it. (Right.) Typically, these blockers (such as IC’s Guardian Gray 7043) can also be cured at lower temperatures to help further contain the dye.

Stay tuned for Part II…”Giving up the Ghost” and “Stretching for the Cure”

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

January 5, 2017 at 5:21 am 3 comments

Happy New Year 2017!

hny2017

Wishing you all a happy and prosperous new year!

From all of us here at International Coatings.

We will reopen on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2017.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

December 31, 2016 at 5:00 am 1 comment

Happy Holidays 2016

ic-happy-holidays-2016-2-sm

We wish you and your families a wonderful holiday season and a new year filled with health, peace, joy, and prosperity.

Thank you for your support and business this past year.

Holiday Schedule:

International Coatings will be closed over the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, from Monday, December 26th through Monday, January 2nd.

We will reopen on Tuesday, January 3rd.

All the best to you and yours,

From all of us at International Coatings  

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

December 19, 2016 at 5:00 am 1 comment

How to Build a Darkroom for a Screen-printing Shop With Limited Floor Space

darkroomracks

Can you suggest some approaches to building a darkroom for a screen-printing shop that has a limited floor space? This was a question posed by a Printwear reader, and here is Kieth Stevens’ response:

A booth can often be constructed of black plastic sheeting, which is relatively cheap to purchase. Choose a location close to the washout area to minimize exposure to light. Simply construct a 1′ x 3′ wooden frame and determine where to place the entry to the dark room. Staple the plastic to the frame and overlap some plastic to create the “door.” By overlapping the plastic sheets, it will minimize the light coming through during entry and exit. Also, be sure that the plastic cover reaches to the floor to block out light completely.

Another way to create a darkroom with limited space is to repurpose an existing room. For example, if the bathroom is not too small, turn it into a dual-purpose room. Repurposing a closet is also a great way to make use of the space you have.

Stand in the darkroom prior to use to be sure that there is no light leaking into the room. It may be necessary to block out minute shafts of light coming in through the bottom or sides of a door. Use plastic sheeting or light-blocking curtains to eliminate any light contamination. Consult your emulsion manufacturer as to which lights would work best and add a dehumidifier. In such a closed room environment, your screens will dry faster and more thoroughly when moisture content is controlled.

International Coatings Blog | Forum for Screen Printing Tips, Ideas, Thoughts

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

December 16, 2016 at 4:49 am 1 comment

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