Posts tagged ‘#icinks’

What kind of basic tools should I own for cleaning my screens off?

Carboard-Ink-Scoop

Cardboard soaking oils from plastisol ink

A reader posted this question on Printwear. Here’s a quick tip from Kieth Stevens:

Although popular, it’s best to stay away from cardboard scrapers as they tend to soak or absorb the liquid portion of the inks. Some screen supply stores offer specially designed plastic ink scrapers. These plastic scrapers feature rounded corners so they avoid harming the screens.

As far as the cleaning liquids go, there are many available that do a great job. You can usually use an ink degradant on the screen to help break down the ink chemistry. However, they seem to be greasy in nature, so once you have cleaned the screen with a degradant, it may be difficult to get tapes to stick to the screen. It is often necessary to add a final cleaning using a more aggressive solvent to achieve a clean, dry screen.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

April 11, 2017 at 11:01 am Leave a comment

The Best Place to put Your Washout Booth

InkWashStation (Rev)Where is the best spot for a washout booth in my production layout? This was a question posed by a Printwear reader, and here is Kieth Stevens’ response:

Typically, the best spot for a wash-out booth is nearest to a water source. However, the best spot for your booth can depend on what you are washing out. If you are washing out emulsion after exposing the screen, you want the washout booth set up close by to avoid further exposing the screen to outside ambient light before washing it out.

However, if the washout booth is going to be used just for reclaiming screens, then it is best located closest to a convenient area for reclaiming. If the washout booth is used for cleaning screens after printing with a water-based ink, then locating it closest to the print area would be best.

Remember, it can be very noisy when blasting a screen with water pressure, so it’s also generally a good idea to make sure the booth isn’t too close to offices, the breakroom, or anywhere in the shop where you want to avoid excessive noise.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

April 4, 2017 at 5:36 am Leave a comment

Repairing Torn Screens

screenTear

Is it possible to reclaim a screen that has a small hole or two in it, or is it not worth the work? This was a question posed by a Printwear reader, and here is Kieth Stevens’ response:

I have used cyanoacrylate glue as an emergency way to prevent a tear from stopping production. However, I usually make a backup screen as soon as the repair is made so that production is not stopped if the repair fails.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

March 28, 2017 at 12:00 pm Leave a comment

ISS Atlantic City Starts This Week

ISS17_AC_637X375

Come join us at the ISS Atlantic City Show starting this Thursday, March 23rd – Saturday, March 25th at the Atlantic City Convention Center. John Levocz will be in attendance, so be sure to connect with him there.

Don’t miss our latest products showcased at our distributor partners’ booths:

Davis International, Booth 1437

Nazdar Source One, Booth 729

See you there!

March 20, 2017 at 2:00 pm 1 comment

International Coatings Celebrates Diamond Anniversary – 60 Years!

 

StampBadgeUniformInternational Coatings, a leader in the development of textile screen-printing inks and a pioneer in the production of vinyl and urethane plastics, specialty coatings and adhesives, and traffic paint, is celebrating its 60th anniversary.

 

International Coatings was founded in 1957 by Herbert A. Wells, a chemist who previously helped develop Elmer’s Glue.  The company’s first products were custom industrial plastic and adhesive compounds.  Over the course of the next 60 years, International Coatings stayed true to its roots as a plastics compounder, pioneering numerous advancements in plastics, coatings and adhesives.  Today, International Coatings manufactures a wide range of branded and custom formulated plastic compounds for the apparel, traffic marking, water filtration, aerospace, sports and recreation, medical and adhesives markets worldwide.

 

The company entered the textile screen printing industry in the early 1960’s.  Many of the products developed by Mr. Wells and International Coatings remain industry standards to this day.  International Coatings’ high-performance Nylon inks and its classic low-bleed whites are industry favorites and have helped establish the company’s reputation for producing products that perform. International Coatings recently expanded its product offerings to include traffic paints and markings, meeting the growing demand for quality products within that industry.

 

“We at International Coatings are thrilled to celebrate 60 years of successes” said Stephen Kahane, International Coatings’ President. “We know that our growth, longevity and success come from our loyal stakeholders – our customers, distributor partners and employees. We are particularly proud that our Diamond Anniversary represents 60 years of continuous family ownership and management.”

 

Looking ahead,  International Coatings is committed to continued innovation, quality products, and outstanding service to our distributor partners and customers.  We recognize that  our success comes from customers’ success.

March 14, 2017 at 1:24 pm 1 comment

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

St-Patricks

Catch the luck of the Irish this St. Patrick’s Day!

Try out our 700 Series direct plastisol screen printing inks in these various greens:

777 Lime Green

775 Dallas Green

733 Kelly Green and

776 Dark Green

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

March 10, 2017 at 2:24 pm 1 comment

Building a Darkroom for Print Shops With Limited Floor Space

darkroomracksCan you suggest some approaches to building a darkroom for a screen-printing shop that has a limited floor space? This was a question posed by a Printwear reader, and here is Kieth Stevens’ response:

A booth can often be constructed of black plastic sheeting, which is relatively cheap to purchase. Choose a location close to the washout area to minimize exposure to light. Simply construct a 1′ x 3′ wooden frame and determine where to place the entry to the dark room. Staple the plastic to the frame and overlap some plastic to create the “door.” By overlapping the plastic sheets, it will minimize the light coming through during entry and exit. Also, be sure that the plastic cover reaches to the floor to block out light completely.

Another way to create a darkroom with limited space is to repurpose an existing room. For example, if the bathroom is not too small, turn it into a dual-purpose room. Repurposing a closet is also a great way to make use of the space you have.

Stand in the darkroom prior to use to be sure that there is no light leaking into the room. It may be necessary to block out minute shafts of light coming in through the bottom or sides of a door. Use plastic sheeting or light-blocking curtains to eliminate any light contamination. Consult your emulsion manufacturer as to which lights would work best and add a dehumidifier. In such a closed room environment, your screens will dry faster and more thoroughly when moisture content is controlled.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

March 7, 2017 at 5:04 am 1 comment

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