Posts tagged ‘international coatings inks’

IT’S NATIONAL ICE CREAM MONTH!

IceCream

Ever popular, the 700 Series Inks come in over 30 ready-to-use colors and four high-pigment colors (HP) as well!! The series also includes our our ProBrite™ (PB) four-color process colors.

Get some ice cream to beat the heat, then some delicious colors for your prints!

700Series2014

July 12, 2017 at 10:06 am 1 comment

Can I use sunlight to burn my screens if I run a small shop with minimal equipment?

Yes, I used to do this when our exposing unit was too small for the screen, or if the bulb had burned out and we couldn’t wait for a new one.

As an aside, this is a method I generally do not recommend, but if you have no other options, it is possible. To begin, use spray adhesive on the film and then press it onto the shirt-side of the screen to be burned. Make sure that the adhesive is sprayed evenly so as not to leave spots of heavier deposits on the film. The trick to this method is not to expose the other side of the screen (squeegee-side) while it’s being handled under the sun.

To avoid exposing the other side of the screen, I’ve used a cart on wheels that is at least as big as the screen. Cut a piece of foam that is at least as thick as the screen is and fits on the inside of the screen. Cover the foam with black T-shirt material, then lay the screen with the substrate side up and place the film in position. Don’t forget to put the film face down.

Now place a piece of glass on top of the screen that is at least as big as the screen and place some weighty object, such as a quart of ink, to push the glass, film, and screen down onto the foam beneath. Be sure to put the weight around the design on the film so that it can be exposed evenly by the sun. The weight will promote the best contact between all the layers. Now simply cart the screen to where you want to expose it.

Another tricky part is getting the right emulsion exposure. You may think that on a cloudy day, the UV rays aren’t passing through, but they are, and on a sunny day, they can be even more intense. Then there is the midday overhead sun which is much stronger than the afternoon sun in regards to the amount of UV available for exposure. I strongly recommend not using a pure photopolymer emulsion as those are just too sensitive for this technique. It may take some experimentation to get the exposure just right.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

May 18, 2017 at 1:29 pm 1 comment

How do I avoid the white spots that pop up on my garment after curing?

Printwear Questions (6)

This was a question posed by a Printwear reader, and here is Kieth Stevens’ response:

This issue happens at times when using a white underbase ink that contains a blowing agent. The blowing agent helps improve opacity and control dye migration. However, the blowing agent contains microbeads that inflate when cured, and some may pop, leaving a hole in the inks printed on top. To help mitigate this issue, use a quality white ink that does not contain a blowing agent, or flash the white a little longer to get the blowing agent to begin puffing earlier. Over-curing the ink may be another cause for the popping as well.


Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

May 9, 2017 at 5:16 am 1 comment

What kind of basic tools should I own for cleaning my screens off?

Carboard-Ink-Scoop

Cardboard soaking oils from plastisol ink

A reader posted this question on Printwear. Here’s a quick tip from Kieth Stevens:

Although popular, it’s best to stay away from cardboard scrapers as they tend to soak or absorb the liquid portion of the inks. Some screen supply stores offer specially designed plastic ink scrapers. These plastic scrapers feature rounded corners so they avoid harming the screens.

As far as the cleaning liquids go, there are many available that do a great job. You can usually use an ink degradant on the screen to help break down the ink chemistry. However, they seem to be greasy in nature, so once you have cleaned the screen with a degradant, it may be difficult to get tapes to stick to the screen. It is often necessary to add a final cleaning using a more aggressive solvent to achieve a clean, dry screen.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

April 11, 2017 at 11:01 am 1 comment

Repairing Torn Screens

screenTear

Is it possible to reclaim a screen that has a small hole or two in it, or is it not worth the work? This was a question posed by a Printwear reader, and here is Kieth Stevens’ response:

I have used cyanoacrylate glue as an emergency way to prevent a tear from stopping production. However, I usually make a backup screen as soon as the repair is made so that production is not stopped if the repair fails.

Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of Centris™ non-Phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whitesspecialty inksspecial effects inks,color matching systemsadditives and reducers.  In addition, International Coatings also manufactures a line of AXEON™ non-Phthalate, non-PVC special effects inks. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

March 28, 2017 at 12:00 pm 1 comment

ISS Atlantic City Starts This Week

ISS17_AC_637X375

Come join us at the ISS Atlantic City Show starting this Thursday, March 23rd – Saturday, March 25th at the Atlantic City Convention Center. John Levocz will be in attendance, so be sure to connect with him there.

Don’t miss our latest products showcased at our distributor partners’ booths:

Davis International, Booth 1437

Nazdar Source One, Booth 729

See you there!

March 20, 2017 at 2:00 pm 1 comment

International Coatings Celebrates Diamond Anniversary – 60 Years!

 

StampBadgeUniformInternational Coatings, a leader in the development of textile screen-printing inks and a pioneer in the production of vinyl and urethane plastics, specialty coatings and adhesives, and traffic paint, is celebrating its 60th anniversary.

 

International Coatings was founded in 1957 by Herbert A. Wells, a chemist who previously helped develop Elmer’s Glue.  The company’s first products were custom industrial plastic and adhesive compounds.  Over the course of the next 60 years, International Coatings stayed true to its roots as a plastics compounder, pioneering numerous advancements in plastics, coatings and adhesives.  Today, International Coatings manufactures a wide range of branded and custom formulated plastic compounds for the apparel, traffic marking, water filtration, aerospace, sports and recreation, medical and adhesives markets worldwide.

 

The company entered the textile screen printing industry in the early 1960’s.  Many of the products developed by Mr. Wells and International Coatings remain industry standards to this day.  International Coatings’ high-performance Nylon inks and its classic low-bleed whites are industry favorites and have helped establish the company’s reputation for producing products that perform. International Coatings recently expanded its product offerings to include traffic paints and markings, meeting the growing demand for quality products within that industry.

 

“We at International Coatings are thrilled to celebrate 60 years of successes” said Stephen Kahane, International Coatings’ President. “We know that our growth, longevity and success come from our loyal stakeholders – our customers, distributor partners and employees. We are particularly proud that our Diamond Anniversary represents 60 years of continuous family ownership and management.”

 

Looking ahead,  International Coatings is committed to continued innovation, quality products, and outstanding service to our distributor partners and customers.  We recognize that  our success comes from customers’ success.

March 14, 2017 at 1:24 pm 1 comment

Older Posts


Image of the Month

"Gellusion" Atom Print

"Gellusion" Atom Print

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,244 other followers

Recent Posts

Visit us on Facebook

Categories


%d bloggers like this: