Posts tagged ‘iss show’

ISS Atlantic City Starts This Week

ISS17_AC_637X375

Come join us at the ISS Atlantic City Show starting this Thursday, March 23rd – Saturday, March 25th at the Atlantic City Convention Center. John Levocz will be in attendance, so be sure to connect with him there.

Don’t miss our latest products showcased at our distributor partners’ booths:

Davis International, Booth 1437

Nazdar Source One, Booth 729

See you there!

March 20, 2017 at 2:00 pm 1 comment

Win A Print Shop Makeover at ISS Long Beach

Win A Print Shop Makeover at ISS Long Beach

Join us at the ISS Long Beach Show, January 20-22, 2017 at the Long Beach Convention Center.

International Coatings is celebrating its 60th Anniversary! To commemorate this special occasion, we’ll be preparing and displaying special print samples and displays. We will also have a daily raffle – read on for the details!

Come by booth #2041 and celebrate with us!


Daily Raffle!

In celebration of our 60th Anniversary, we will be raffling off an ink kit of your choice – either a color mixing system starter kit or a special effects kit for the lucky daily winner. 

All California-based entries will also be eligible for a Grand Prize – An Expert Print Shop Makeover. One of our print shop experts will travel to your business for an in-depth consultation on how your shop can run smoother and more productively!

Our print expert will help the winning shop troubleshoot problems and suggest ways it can maximize its capabilities.


Don’t miss out!  Come by Booth #2041 and enter to win!!!
For a FREE  pass to the show, enter promo code INTERCOAT.

See you there!!!

 

January 6, 2017 at 5:15 am 1 comment

IC Inks Used Around ISS LB 2016

vastex02-HRBesides showcasing International Coatings ink at our own booth’s print demo, our inks were used at various booths around the show floor at the recent ISS Long Beach show.

Besides the M & R Booth (See image from previous post) printing with custom mixed colors using our 7500 UltraMix® Color Matching System, our inks were also used at the Vastex Booth (7600 Series and Legacy White 7014) on their manual press and the 700 Series were used on Anatol’s Automatic press.

mclogan16

Some of our distributors were also using our inks for print demos at their booth. McLogan used our 7600 Series inks for their print, and Ryonet used our 7100 Performance Pro™ Inks.

ryonet02HR

Ryonet’s print from ISS Long Beach

All in all, a busy show for us!

February 5, 2016 at 11:12 am Leave a comment

ISS Long Beach Started Today!

20160121_180750Visit us at the Long Beach show this weekend and check out our cutting edge line of Axeon,  non-PVC inks, which have been very well received. Hurry on over to our booth #1831!

We’re featuring live print demos with our newest inks. See you there!

January 22, 2016 at 8:08 pm Leave a comment

ISS Long Beach 2016

IC - ISS LONG BEACH 2016

Less than three weeks away, ISS Long Beach trade show is coming to town!

Come by our booth # 1831 and learn what new products and techniques we have in store for you!

This year, award-winning students from Pasadena City College will also be printing at our booth.  Come catch the excitement and get a pass for FREE by typing in COATINGS for the promo code.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

#internationalcoatings #iccink #textilescreenprintinginks #creatingperformancesolutions #screenprintinginks #screenprint #isslongbeach2016 #iss2016 #imprintedsportswearshow #isslongbeach #booth1831

January 6, 2016 at 5:00 am Leave a comment

The Right Tools For The Job – Part 3

This handy chart shows the relationship between squegee hardness (durometer) and mesh lines (per inch) and ink deposit thickness

This handy chart shows the relationship between squegee hardness (durometer) and mesh lines (per inch) and ink deposit thickness

Here is the third part of Kieth’s article about the importance of using the right tool for the job and knowing what the tool can do.  If you missed the previous blogs, here you can read Part 1 and Part 2.  You can also read the full article (PDF) from here.

MESH

Just as squeegee hardness affects ink deposit, so does mesh count:  The lower the mesh count, the larger the ink deposit.  But are there any other features differentiating one mesh type over another?

Thread Count

As most printers know, mesh controls the flow of ink once the squeegee passes over the image. The general rule of thumb is that the lower the mesh count is per inch (or cm), the larger the amount of ink flow.

However, there are some instances where it is possible to go higher in the amount of threads per inch/cm and get an even larger amount of flow.   How so? Let’s discuss the next aspect about mesh: Thread diameter.

This image shows how thread thickness/diameter affects mesh opening, even for the same mesh count. The thinner the thread, the larger the opening, the more ink can flow through.

This image shows how thread thickness/diameter affects mesh opening, even for the same mesh count. The thinner the thread, the larger the opening, the more ink can flow through.

Thread Diameter

Believe it or not, not all meshes at the same thread count function the same. This has to do with the actual thread diameter used to create the mesh. Obviously, the thicker the thread diameter, the higher the tension you can achieve when stretching the screen. The thicker thread is also less likely to cause the screen mesh to pop or break.

Breaking mesh is bad, right? Agreed – however, there are some options to consider. Some mesh is made with thinner thread diameter (same mesh count) and if used with care, won’t have to be stretched to such a high level as the thicker thread.

What is the advantage of using the thinner thread diameter? For the same mesh count, the thinner thread diameter allows for a greater percentage amount of open area within the mesh, thus resulting in higher image definition and increased ink flow.

So if the thread diameter is smaller, going to a higher mesh count is possible to still achieve a larger amount of ink flow and finer detail definition in the print.

Here is a simple guide that will help in choosing the right mesh counts for the right job:

Mesh Count: 25, 40 – Usage: Coarse Glitter Inks

Mesh Count: 60, 86 – Usage:  Specialty inks, such as puff or high-density, fine shimmers, glitters or metallics

Mesh Count: 110, 155 – Usage:  Use where a large deposit of ink is needed, such as athletic numbers, printing white on black fabric, low-detail art or heavy white ink

Mesh Count: 160, 180, 200 – Usage:  Good for printing underbase white to create a softer overall feel, good medium-sized mesh count for medium-detailed artwork. The 200-count mesh can be a happy medium screen selection for when a 230 mesh is too fine and a 155 mesh is too coarse.

Mesh Count: 230, 280, 305 – Usage:  Low ink deposit, works well for halftone printing, simulated process or CMYK process printing

Mesh Count: 355 – Usage:  Very low ink deposit, generally used by very experienced printers only. Often used for printing 65 line or higher halftones for very detailed images

PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

So with all this said it is hard to explain the total relationship that occurs when the squeegee touches the ink and applies the ink to the shirt.

A soft squeegee pushing low viscosity ink (thin) through a coarse screen can apply too much ink. But use that soft squeegee to push a thick ink through a fine mesh and it can spell disaster.

Similarly, when a hard squeegee is used to push a thin ink using an open mesh or if the same hard squeegee is used to push thin ink with a lot of pressure through a fine mesh, both scenarios may result in less desirable printing outcomes.

Knowing how one tool or another can affect the outcome of the print, I am able to use the knowledge and adjust the variables to make a bad ink look better or a good ink look outstanding. I liken printing to an art form, where a good printer can use his tools to create the best possible print. Much of the finesse in screen printing will only come with experience, but knowing the basics about the relationship of how different tools can affect different aspects of the print outcome is half the battle.
Kieth Stevens is the Western regional sales manager for International Coatings. He has been teaching screen printing for more than 10 years and is a regular contributor to International Coatings’ blogs.

Blade samples courtesy of Fimor, Serilor brand.  Print samples courtesy of Fimor.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com

November 17, 2015 at 5:00 am Leave a comment

Using The Process Color Selector Wheel

ColorSelectorHere’s a quick tip from John Hatcher, recently published in Impressions:  We recently found some old promo and marketing materials in our warehouse, and amongst the give-away items, we found a box of Process Color Selector Wheels. What a find! These nifty wheels used to be standard tools in a printer’s shop.

A quick check on the web revealed that these color selector wheels are still being sold today. How are these different from a regular color wheel? These process color selector wheels allow the user to choose or check a CMYK color value before proofing or printing. Hence these wheels were widely used by printers, graphic designers, color separators, and even ad agencies.

How does it work? A regular color wheel illustrates the relationship between the various colors, but the process color selector wheel actually previews what a color will look like before printing. Four ColorSelector2transparent disks of tinted Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black are mounted on the disk, each printed in 10% increments of color strength, from 0% (clear) to 100% solid color. A viewing window then shows the user what resulting color a particular combination of the four colors will produce.

By moving the various color disks around, one can produce up to 40,000 different color combinations with specified color percentages to arrive at those colors. Pretty cool tool!

John Hatcher served at International Coatings for more than 35 years in various senior managerial positions, including product manager. Prior to working at International Coatings, he owned his own screen printing business.

International Coatings manufactures a complete line of non-phthalate screen printing inks, including a wide variety of whites, specialty inks, special effects inks, color matching systems, additives and reducers. For more information on our products, please visit our website at www.iccink.com.

May 28, 2015 at 10:09 am Leave a comment

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